Entries in category: Portraits

Eve Arnold

Eve Arnold (born April 21, 1912- Jan 4 2012) was an American photojournalist. She joined Magnum Photos agency in 1951, and became a full member in 1957. Arnold was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to immigrant Russian-Jewish parents, William (born Velvel Sklarski) and Bessie Cohen (born Bosya Laschiner). Her interest in becoming a photographer began in 1946, when she worked for a photo-finishing plant in New York City. She briefly learned photographic skills in 1948 from Harper’s Bazaar art director Alexei Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research in Manhattan. Arnold is best known for her images of actress Marilyn Monroe on the set of Monroe’s last (1961) film, The Misfits, but she took many photos of Monroe from 1951 onwards. An exhibition of her previously unseen photos of Monroe was displayed at the Halcyon Gallery in London in May 2005. Monroe trusted Arnold more than any other photographer. Not only did Arnold photograph VIPs such as Queen Elizabeth II, Malcolm X, and Joan Crawford, she traveled extensively around the world, photographing in China, Russia, South Africa and Afghanistan. In 1980, she had her first solo exhibition, which featured her photographic work done in China at the Brooklyn Museum in New York City. In the same year, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society of Magazine Photographers. In 1995, she was made a fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and elected Master Photographer by New York’s International Center of Photography. She also did a series of portraits of American Presidents’ wives. Arnold left the United States in the early 1960s with her son, Francis, moving to England, which eventually became her adopted home. In England, while working for the UK Sunday Times, she began to seriously use colour as a medium for photography. In her adopted homeland, she was later appointed a member of the Advisory Committee of the National Media Museum formerly the Museum of Photography, Film & Television in Bradford in 1997

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Robert Doisneau

Robert Doisneau (14 April 1912 – 1 April 1994) was a French photographer. In the 1930s he used a Leica on the streets of Paris; together with Henri Cartier-Bresson he was a pioneer of photojournalism. He is renowned for his 1950 image Le baiser de l’hôtel de ville (Kiss by the Town Hall), a photo of a couple kissing in the busy streets of Paris. Robert Doisneau was appointed a Chevalier (Knight) of the National Order of the Légion d’honneur in 1984.
Robert Doisneau was known for his modest, playful, and ironic images of amusing juxtapositions, mingling social classes, and eccentrics in contemporary Paris streets and cafes. Influenced by the work of André Kertész, Eugène Atget, and Henri Cartier-Bresson, in over twenty books he presented a charming vision of human frailty and life as a series of quiet, incongruous moments.
Doisneau’s work gives unusual prominence and dignity to children’s street culture; returning again and again to the theme of children at play in the city, unfettered by parents. His work treats their play with seriousness and respect. In his honour, and owing to this, there are several primary schools named after him.
(by Wikipedia)

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BB Forever: Brigitte Bardot, the Legend

One of the last remaining icons of 1960’s sex appeal and French film stars of the New Wave era, Vanity Fair recently visited the rarely interviewed Brigitte Bardot for their March 2012 issue. For the rest of 2012, the photo collection „BB Forever: Brigitte Bardot, the Legend” will travel the country, appearing at Sofitel hotels in Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington, and, finally New York. You can read about the visit here, and check out some iconic photos of the „Temptress of St. Tropez” below.

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Herb Ritts Portraits, from Madonna to Cindy Crawford

The Getty Center, Los Angeles, USA

April 3–September 2, 2012

In the late 1970s, the mostly self-taught, Los Angeles–based photographer Herb Ritts stumbled upon success, after his impromptu images of his longtime friend Richard Gere—taken at a California gas station, on a lark—were widely published and well received. For the next two decades, Ritts distinguished himself from his East Coast counterparts with his clean, minimal aesthetic and knack for Southern California light and landscapes. He also built an incomparable portfolio of fashion and celebrity portraiture as well as provocative, sculptural nudes, often featuring famous athletes and dancers. Before his untimely death in 2002, at the age of 50, Ritts had been the master behind 13 music videos (Madonna, Janet Jackson, Britney Spears), more than 50 television commercials (Chanel, Calvin Klein, Estée Lauder), hundreds of magazine spreads, with almost 40 covers for Vanity Fair alone, and eight books, including this month’s Herb Ritts L.A. Style—a retrospective monograph and exhibition on display at Los Angeles’s J. Paul Getty Museum from April 3 through August 26. Approaching the 10th anniversary of his death, VF.com refocuses on Ritts’s multifaceted and ever fashionable career, with an exclusive selection of renowned as well as several previously unpublished photographs from the show.

( Lenora Jane Estes, Vanity Fair)

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Herb Ritts changed world of photography

Herb Ritts revolutionized fashion photography, modernized the nude, and transformed celebrities into icons.

Through hard work and a distinctive vision, Herb Ritts (1952–2002) fashioned himself into one of the top photographers to emerge from the 1980s. Ritts’s aesthetic incorporated facets of life in and around Los Angeles. He often made use of the bright California sunlight to produce bold contrasts, and his preference for outdoor locations such as the desert and the beach helped to separate his work from that of his New York-based peers. Ritts’s intimate portraiture, his modern yet classical treatment of the nude, and his innovative approach to fashion brought him international acclaim and placed him securely within an American tradition of portrait and magazine photography that includes Richard Avedon, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Irving Penn.

 

Magnificent photobook about Eugène Atget – Paris

I bought amazing book. Genial old photos from Paris. Atget wrote in 1920, „I may say that I have in my possession all of Old Paris”. Indeed, he knew the city like the back of his hand and had the pictures to prove it. He captured the historical, atmospheric Paris: churches, monuments, and buildings, as well as bars, shop windows, street-peddlers, and prostitutes. Traversing all of its layers, he immortalized the true spirit of Old Paris.

 


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