Entries in category: Portraits

MAGNUM MAGNUM

The first edition of Magnum Magnum was the photography book of the decade, a landmark publication that celebrated the vision, imagination and brilliance of the world’s most renowned photographic agency.

With over 400 images selected by Magnum’s photographers, this is at once a permanent record of many of the iconic images from the last 60 years by a legendary creative collective, and an insight, as seen through the critical eyes and minds of Magnum photographers, into what makes a great photograph.

Magnum Magnum harks back to Magnum’s early days, evoking the spirit of what made it such a unique creative environment, where each of the four founding members picture-edited the others’ photographs. Here, a current Magnum photographer selects and critiques six key works of another of the 69 photographers featured, with a commentary explaining the rationale behind their choice.

2012 World Open of Photography – $50,000US Cash Prize

From undiscovered photographers to emerging artists to seasoned professionals, everyone is welcome to be a part of The Open. It exists to discover – and rediscover – the most inspiring photographers of our generation. It is for any photographer who wants to open the door to worldwide exposure, connections and opportunity.

It’s simple: photographers submit their best images in any of the 5 categories. A global audience clicks the photos they love. The most-loved images continually move to the forefront for increased exposure. Artists are encouraged to ignite their own social networks to fuel their votes. Half of the 200 finalists are chosen by public appreciation, the other half are chosen by a panel of the sharpest eyes in the business to capture the work of those who may not yet have an online following. The final judging panel awards the category winners and Photographer of the Year. The SOLO prize purse is $25,000.

More info here.

A Natural Order- exhibition of Lucas Foglia

Michael Hoppen Contemporary is delighted to announce the first UK exhibition of Lucas Foglia’s beautiful and internationally acclaimed series A Natural Order, which is accompanied by the highly commended photo book of the same title.

Lucas Foglia grew up on a farm on Long Island just 30 miles from Manhattan. His parents were part of the post 1960’s “back to the land movement”. Much of the area surrounding the family home became increasingly urbanised, but his parents continued to strive for self-sufficiency.  “While malls and supermarkets developed around us, we heated our house with wood, farmed and canned our food, and bartered the plants we grew for everything from shoes to dental work”.

 

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A Photograph Is Not an Opinion. Or Is It?

Undertake to do a book of photographs of people with nothing more in common than that they are women (and living in America at the end of the twentieth century), all–well, almost all–fully clothed, therefore not the other kind of all-women picture book.

Start with no more than a commanding notion of the sheer interestingness of the subject, especially in view of the unprecedented changes in the consciousness of many women in these last decades, and a resolve to stay open to whim and opportunity.

Sample, explore, revisit, choose, arrange, without claiming to have brought to the page a representative miscellany.

Even so, a large number of pictures of what is, nominally, a single subject will inevitably be felt to be representative in some sense. How much more so with this subject, with this book, an anthology of destinies and disabilities and new possibilities; a book that invites the sympathetic responses we bring to the depiction of a minority (for that is what women are, by every criterion except the numerical), featuring many portraits of those who are a credit to their sex. Such a book has to feel instructive, even if it tells us what we think we already know about the overcoming of perennial impediments and prejudices and cultural handicaps, the conquest of new zones of achievement. Of course, such a book would be misleading if it did not touch on the bad news as well: the continuing authority of demeaning stereotypes, the continuing violence (domestic assault is the leading cause of injuries to American women). Any large-scale picturing of women belongs to the ongoing story of how women are presented, and how they are invited to think of themselves. A book of photographs of women must, whether it intends to or not, raise the question of women –there is no equivalent „question of men.” Men, unlike women, are not a work in progress.

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London 2012 Olympics: Winning moments

The 2012 Summer Olympic Games, officially the Games of the XXX Olympiad (and known informally as London 2012) are in full swing in London, United Kingdom. Around 10,500 athletes from 204 National Olympic Committees (the group responsible for organizing their people’s participation in the games) will compete. Thousands and thousands of images will be made in London of the athletes and the spectators; the venues and the celebrations; the pomp and the circumstance. They can come from any time during competition or the second a medal is won. Here’s an updated look at Olympians in winning moments as the Games head to their conclusion this Sunday in London.

 

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Abir Abdullah in Bangladesh

Child takes shelter with his mother before the cyclone hit. Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh.

 

Abir Abdullah born in 1971. Started photography career in 1996 at Drik Picture Library, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Currently working in the European Pressphoto Agency (EPA) as Bangladesh correspondent. Photographs published in Blink, Time, Newsweek, Der Speigel, New Internationalist, Guardian, International Herald Tribune, Asiaweek, Elmundo, Stern, Geo etc. Won Mother jones award for the documentary project War Veterans of Bangladesh in 2001.

Eve Arnold

Eve Arnold (born April 21, 1912- Jan 4 2012) was an American photojournalist. She joined Magnum Photos agency in 1951, and became a full member in 1957. Arnold was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to immigrant Russian-Jewish parents, William (born Velvel Sklarski) and Bessie Cohen (born Bosya Laschiner). Her interest in becoming a photographer began in 1946, when she worked for a photo-finishing plant in New York City. She briefly learned photographic skills in 1948 from Harper’s Bazaar art director Alexei Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research in Manhattan. Arnold is best known for her images of actress Marilyn Monroe on the set of Monroe’s last (1961) film, The Misfits, but she took many photos of Monroe from 1951 onwards. An exhibition of her previously unseen photos of Monroe was displayed at the Halcyon Gallery in London in May 2005. Monroe trusted Arnold more than any other photographer. Not only did Arnold photograph VIPs such as Queen Elizabeth II, Malcolm X, and Joan Crawford, she traveled extensively around the world, photographing in China, Russia, South Africa and Afghanistan. In 1980, she had her first solo exhibition, which featured her photographic work done in China at the Brooklyn Museum in New York City. In the same year, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society of Magazine Photographers. In 1995, she was made a fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and elected Master Photographer by New York’s International Center of Photography. She also did a series of portraits of American Presidents’ wives. Arnold left the United States in the early 1960s with her son, Francis, moving to England, which eventually became her adopted home. In England, while working for the UK Sunday Times, she began to seriously use colour as a medium for photography. In her adopted homeland, she was later appointed a member of the Advisory Committee of the National Media Museum formerly the Museum of Photography, Film & Television in Bradford in 1997

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