Entries in category: Old photo

Paul Reas: Daydreaming about the Good Times – exhibition

From The Valleys Project (1985) Paul ReasExhibition Paul Reas: Daydreaming about the Good Times at Impressions Gallery, Bradford. Paul Reas is part of the pioneering generation of photographers who revealed and critiqued British class and culture in the 1980′s and 90′s. Strongly influenced by his working class upbringing in Bradford, Reas used humour and sharp observation to comment on a new corporate and commercial world epitomised by heritage industry sites, retail parks, and supermarkets.

 

 

 

 

10th Dec 2013 – 08th Mar 2014

Impressions Gallery
Centenary Square
Bradford
BD1 1SD

UK
www.impressions-gallery.com

Vintage of Paris by Paul Almásy

Paul AlmásyLate Hungarian photojournalist Paul Almásy traveled across the globe, capturing images of people from all walks of life around the world. Over the course of his career, which spanned more than 60 years, Almásy spent multiple decades documenting the intimate and quaint beauty of Paris and its people. His images are an ode to the city, bearing the photographer’s own love for Parisian culture and lifestyle.

The photographer’s joyful and romantic portraits reveal a sense of life that Parisians in the mid-20th century lived—one filled with simple, daily pleasures. From youths merrily playing instruments and dancing in public parks and streets to older couples taking a moment to get lost in each other’s eyes, there’s an undeniable air about the city of love that transcends time.

 

 

 

 

 

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Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004) – master of street photography

„To take a photograph is to align the head, the eye and the heart. It’s a way of life.”
Born in Chanteloup, Seine-et-Marne, Henri Cartier-Bresson developed a strong fascination with painting early on, and particularly with Surrealism. In 1932, after spending a year in the Ivory Coast, he discovered the Leica – his camera of choice thereafter – and began a life-long passion for photography. In 1933 he had his first exhibition at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York. He later made films with Jean Renoir.Taken prisoner of war in 1940, he escaped on his third attempt in 1943 and subsequently joined an underground organization to assist prisoners and escapees. In 1945 he photographed the liberation of Paris with a group of professional journalists and then filmed the documentary Le Retour (The Return).

In 1947, with Robert Capa, George Rodger, David ‚Chim’ Seymour and William Vandivert, he founded Magnum Photos. After three years spent travelling in the East, in 1952 he returned to Europe, where he published his first book, Images à la Sauvette (published in English as The Decisive Moment).

Henri Cartier-Bresson

 

 

FRANCE. Paris. Place de l’Europe. Gare Saint Lazare. 1932.

 
Behind Saint Lazare Train Station is one of the most famous street photos of all time. It exemplifies Henri Cartier Bresson’s approach to chasing the decisive moment. The urban myth is that he took the photo through a hole in the fence without sighting it. It’s also one of the only shots that he ever cropped.

Paris Photo 2012

Paris Photo, 16th edition at the Grand Palais — the best of 19th century, modern and contemporary photography in the heart of Paris. This year the Paris Photo Platform features 4 days of conferences directed by Roxana Marcoci, Curator of Photography at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, with the special contribution of Paul Holdengräber, Director of „LIVE from The New York Public Library.” Structured as an experimental platform for critical discussions, the Paris Photo Platform engages in dynamic and robust debates about the expanded field and perspectives of photography. Participants feature an international roster of leading artists, architects, filmmakers, cultural historians, and theorists in the field exchanging ideas on the relational contexts in which photography operates today.

15-18 November 2012
Grand Palace, Paris, France

Full program

London Street Photography 1860-2010

London Street Photography  documents the movement, diversity and seeming incoherence of the most multicultural city in the world. Its defining characteristic is the keen eye of the photographer catching the moment of a chance encounter, a fleeting expression or a momentary juxtaposition in a decisive click. The first ‚instantaneous’ London street scenes were taken in the early 1860s, and the 20th century saw many photographers, famous and lesser-known, continue to capture the daily life of London. London Street Photography showcases the Museum of London’s unique historic collection of photographs. It contains the work of more than seventy photographers and is a fascinating view of London street life of the last 150 years. It includes the work of well-known photographers such as Paul Martin, John Thomson, Humphrey Spender, Bert Hardy, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Roger Mayne and Tony Ray-Jones as well as the work of many anonymous photographers whose contribution has been just as important in recording the story of the city.

Publisher: Museum of London/Dewi Lewis

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