Entries in category: Old photo

MAGNUM MAGNUM

The first edition of Magnum Magnum was the photography book of the decade, a landmark publication that celebrated the vision, imagination and brilliance of the world’s most renowned photographic agency.

With over 400 images selected by Magnum’s photographers, this is at once a permanent record of many of the iconic images from the last 60 years by a legendary creative collective, and an insight, as seen through the critical eyes and minds of Magnum photographers, into what makes a great photograph.

Magnum Magnum harks back to Magnum’s early days, evoking the spirit of what made it such a unique creative environment, where each of the four founding members picture-edited the others’ photographs. Here, a current Magnum photographer selects and critiques six key works of another of the 69 photographers featured, with a commentary explaining the rationale behind their choice.

Photo-Blends of 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Present Day

Photographer Shawn Clover created a set of composite photographs of San Francisco, California, blending pictures from the 1906 earthquake that hit the city, with present day images. Clover collected archival photos of the earthquake’s aftermath. He then replicated the photos himself, down to the location, camera position and focal length, then the rest of the task involved high Photoshop  skills. After looking at the stunning results, it’s hard to imagine today that 106 years ago, much of the city we know now was a broken wasteland of rubble. The 1906 earthquake, and its subsequent fires, destroyed much of San Francisco and killed thousands. The work of Clover reminds us of photo blends created by Sergey Larenkov in his Ghosts of WWII series. Clover’s work is broken into two parts, Part 1 was created in 2010 and Part 2 was completed a couple of weeks ago.

read more

Eve Arnold

Eve Arnold (born April 21, 1912- Jan 4 2012) was an American photojournalist. She joined Magnum Photos agency in 1951, and became a full member in 1957. Arnold was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to immigrant Russian-Jewish parents, William (born Velvel Sklarski) and Bessie Cohen (born Bosya Laschiner). Her interest in becoming a photographer began in 1946, when she worked for a photo-finishing plant in New York City. She briefly learned photographic skills in 1948 from Harper’s Bazaar art director Alexei Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research in Manhattan. Arnold is best known for her images of actress Marilyn Monroe on the set of Monroe’s last (1961) film, The Misfits, but she took many photos of Monroe from 1951 onwards. An exhibition of her previously unseen photos of Monroe was displayed at the Halcyon Gallery in London in May 2005. Monroe trusted Arnold more than any other photographer. Not only did Arnold photograph VIPs such as Queen Elizabeth II, Malcolm X, and Joan Crawford, she traveled extensively around the world, photographing in China, Russia, South Africa and Afghanistan. In 1980, she had her first solo exhibition, which featured her photographic work done in China at the Brooklyn Museum in New York City. In the same year, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society of Magazine Photographers. In 1995, she was made a fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and elected Master Photographer by New York’s International Center of Photography. She also did a series of portraits of American Presidents’ wives. Arnold left the United States in the early 1960s with her son, Francis, moving to England, which eventually became her adopted home. In England, while working for the UK Sunday Times, she began to seriously use colour as a medium for photography. In her adopted homeland, she was later appointed a member of the Advisory Committee of the National Media Museum formerly the Museum of Photography, Film & Television in Bradford in 1997

read more

Robert Doisneau

Robert Doisneau (14 April 1912 – 1 April 1994) was a French photographer. In the 1930s he used a Leica on the streets of Paris; together with Henri Cartier-Bresson he was a pioneer of photojournalism. He is renowned for his 1950 image Le baiser de l’hôtel de ville (Kiss by the Town Hall), a photo of a couple kissing in the busy streets of Paris. Robert Doisneau was appointed a Chevalier (Knight) of the National Order of the Légion d’honneur in 1984.
Robert Doisneau was known for his modest, playful, and ironic images of amusing juxtapositions, mingling social classes, and eccentrics in contemporary Paris streets and cafes. Influenced by the work of André Kertész, Eugène Atget, and Henri Cartier-Bresson, in over twenty books he presented a charming vision of human frailty and life as a series of quiet, incongruous moments.
Doisneau’s work gives unusual prominence and dignity to children’s street culture; returning again and again to the theme of children at play in the city, unfettered by parents. His work treats their play with seriousness and respect. In his honour, and owing to this, there are several primary schools named after him.
(by Wikipedia)

read more

Magnificent photobook about Eugène Atget – Paris

I bought amazing book. Genial old photos from Paris. Atget wrote in 1920, „I may say that I have in my possession all of Old Paris”. Indeed, he knew the city like the back of his hand and had the pictures to prove it. He captured the historical, atmospheric Paris: churches, monuments, and buildings, as well as bars, shop windows, street-peddlers, and prostitutes. Traversing all of its layers, he immortalized the true spirit of Old Paris.

 

Exposition: Eugène Atget, Musée Carnavalet, Paris

From 25 April to 29 July 2012

The Carnavalet Museum presents the Parisian work of one of the most famous photographers of the 20th century, Eugène Atget (Libourne, 1857 – Paris, 1927).

The exhibition proposes a selection of 230 prints created in Paris between 1898 and 1927.

This retrospective, which brings together some well-known images and others previously unseen, paints an unusual portrait of the capital, far from the clichés of the Belle Époque. Visitors will discover the streets of the Paris of old, the gardens, the quays of the Seine, the former boutiques and the travelling salesmen. Atget’s photographs also reveal the changes in his processes: when he started out, this self-taught photographer tried to bring together landscapes and motifs and then images of Paris streets, in order to sell them to artists as models. It was when he dedicated himself to the streets of Paris that he attracted the attention of prestigious institutions such as the Carnavalet Museum and the National Library, which were to become his main clients until the end of his life.

read more


Strona 2 z 3123